How to Apply

How to Apply

We are usually booked for six months or longer ahead of time. We have a waiting list but if you wish to apply for a future date, we suggest the following.

Under our section Purposes and Policy we describe the criteria whereby we appoint writers, what we offer which includes bursaries, also duration of residencies and obligations in return.

Under our section Residencies we list those who have stayed here and under Gallery there are photographs and exerpts from the reports that are always required of each writer.

Under Contact Us you will see how to reach us to enquire by post, e-mail or phone. Having done this, please apply by writing to us an old-fashioned letter, not more than two A4 sheets and also send a curriculum vitae about your background, achievements and future aims.

Tell us why you want a residency; do you need time and privacy or have you financial, personal, housing or medical needs or are you just tired?

Applicants from outside the UK and Ireland are received but there must be a valid reason to justify a visit, such as study or attendance at a conference.

Tell us how much time and money you want. Give us an indication of your personal, housing and financial situation (if you wish). Also give us a contact with your publisher or promoter, and an agent if you have one.

Advice

Your letter is your ambassador as we do not have a form. How you handle a sheet of paper and whether you have a letter-head are matters we regard of interest, and this does not depend on money but indicates how seriously you regard yourself. An e-mail starting ‘Hi Sarah’ followed by disconnected bits and pieces does not constitute an application.

Do not send books, or exerpts as we become inundated and they are taken to OXFAM.

If we are interested in you, we shall contact your publisher/agent for verification and background and then we shall ask for publications that one of us will read.

We use e-mail and phone thereafter for correspondence.

Our suggestions on content are that if we cannot read your letter with interest, it is unlikely we would find your book beguiling. While we are not unsympathetic, we receive far too many listings of illness, divorce and wrongdoings received and while we are aware that this is the lot of womankind, there are valid alternatives. Too many woeful writings depress us and, in the meantime, we are longing to hear about philosophy, philately, politics, pornography, pharmacy, poetry, philology, finance, food…….indeed, anything whatsoever. Amaze us!

Virginia Woolf wrote, ‘I am by no means confining (women) to fiction. For books have a way of influencing each other. Fiction will be much better for standing cheek by jowl with poetry and philosophy’. A Room of One’s Own 1928